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Maori PH workforce development: annual work plan and update on priority projects

 
 
Each year, the Ministry of Health releases a Te Uru Kahikatea (TUK) Annual Workplan detailing the ongoing and new work for any given year, including work flowing from E Ara Tauwhaiti Whakarae (2007); the Maori health workforce development framework and implementation plan.  
 
 

To order a hardcopy of TUK Annual Workplan 2009, please email moh@wickliffe.co.nz and quote reference HP4799.
 
TUK Maori Workplan 2011-2017

Te Uru Kahikatea Workplan 2010-2011

Te Uru Kahikatea 2009 Workplan

 
TUK Progresss Report 2009
 
TUK Progress Report 2010 - PDF

TUK Progress Report 2010 - word
 

 
 

Hauora.com’s review of E Ara Tauwhaiti Whakarae; Maori health research and development of an action plan

 

In June 2009, Hauora.com was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to: 

  • Develop a 3 year action plan based on the recommendations contained within E Ara Tauwhaiti Whakarae
  • Provide recommendations regarding the development of tertiary qualifications in public health
  • Investigate models of mentoring
  • Provide project management support to the implementation of other Te Uru Kahikatea health program priorities
  • Provide strategic advice

 
Hauora.com’s initial health research has identified:

  • Maori are under-represented throughout the health sector across all health professions
  • Maori tend to be clustered in areas that require low levels of formal qualifications, and most work on the area we loosely  describe as “public health”
  • Maori account for only 5.7% of the total health professional and clinical workforce
  • It is estimated that 52% of the Maori health workforce are employed by District Health Boards, 32% by Maori health organisations and 26% by other agencies
  • There is a need to improve the quality of the Maori public health workforce.

 
Grant Berghan from Hauora.com considers that making progress to address the above is critical if the public health workforce is to deliver community health services (including health promotion and health protection) that are competent and culturally appropriate to Maori and others.  "It will require co-ordinated action across the domains of public health policy, planning, research and funding", says Grant.
 

Further updates on Hauora.com’s work will be posted on this website as they become available.

 

 

 

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