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Maori Public Health Workforce Development Research: Survey of Organisations and Individuals

Maori Public Health Workforce Development Research: Survey of Organisations and Individuals

31 Dec 2003

 
Report Summary
 
This report presents the results for the Maori public health workforce, drawn from a series of three linked surveys. They covered public health organisations in New Zealand that contract with the Public Health Directorate of the Ministry of Health, and the employees of these organisations.

The data for these surveys was collected in the first half of 2004, while the numbers of employees and numbers of positions are all as at 1 January 2004. 

A CATI (computer-assisted telephone interviewing) survey included 185 of the organisations, with a response rate of 95%. Of these 72 were Maori organisations.

A self-completion survey included 133 of the organisations, with a response rate of 64%. Forty-two Maori organisations participated in this survey, representing a response rate of 58%.

A self-completion survey included 666 members of the public health workforce, with a response rate of 28%. There were 215 Maori employees who participated, but it is not possible to calculate a response rate for Maori. The following are examples of the results for the given categories.

Profile of Maori Public Health Organisations and Their Employees
  • Maori organisations account for 39% of the public health organisations.
  • They account for 30% of the positions and 30% of the FTEs.
  • 54% of the dedicated Maori positions are in Maori organisations.
  • Community workers account for 55% of the dedicated Maori roles in Maori organisations, but only 21% of the dedicated Maori roles in non-Maori organisations.
  • Of the 215 Maori employees who participated, 51% worked in Maori organisations, 21% in PHUs and 14% in NGOs.

Public Health Workforce Programmes
  • Of the 72 Maori organisations, most are working across – Nutrition, Physical Activity, Immunisation, Mental health promotion/Well child, Prevention of alcohol/drug harm/sexual health, Injury prevention/tobacco control
  • The following are programmes in which significantly higher proportions of Maori employees are working, compared to total workforce - Physical activity (40% Maori, 30% total), Tobacco control (35%, 27%), Quality planning (33%, 24%), Prevention for alcohol/drug harm (32%, 25%), Mental health promotion (29%, 20%), Injury prevention (28%, 20%), Oral health (26%, 17%)
  • The following are programmes in which significantly lower proportions of Maori employees are working, compared to total workforce - Communicable diseases (11% Maori, 26% total), Physical environments (11%, 17%)

What Public Health Issues Are Considered Most Important
  • The two main issues for Maori organisations, for both the present and future, are - Staffing, including lack of skilled staff available, understaffed, and general recruitment problems, Funding and salaries/financial, particularly funding needed for specific roles
  • For Maori individuals, the main issues for both the present and future, are - Funding and salaries/financial, particularly pay rates, Management of staff, including not valuing/acknowledging staff and increased workloads/burnout

Experience, Recruitment, Satisfaction and Retention of Employees
  • By far the majority of Maori employees across public health roles have been in their current positions for up to 5 years (81%), which is significantly greater than total public health workforce proportion (67%).
  • The three things Maori employees overall value most about their current public health position are - Interesting areas of work (77%), I can make a difference (73%), Opportunity to develop new skills (68%).  This is similar to the total workforce proportions.
  • By far the main reason given by Maori employees for considering leaving the public health workforce is for a different career path (24%), which is significantly higher than total workforce proportions (12%).
  • A significantly greater number of Maori employees have incomes up to $30,000 pa. (25% Maori, 14% total workforce), or between $30,000 and $40,000 pa. (37% Maori, 28% total workforce)

Qualifications and Training, Including Training Needs
  • 71% of Maori public health employees have a tertiary qualification, which is significantly less than the total workforce (83%).
  • 29% of Maori employees have degrees, which is significantly lower than 45% in the total workforce.
  • The types of employer support most likely to increase the likelihood of tertiary studies being completed, are - Available as in-service (65%), culturally focused (57%, significantly higher than total workforce proportion of 28%), Available in the region where live (54%), Can be built on to get higher qualification (52%, significantly higher than total workforce proportion of 42%)
  • The following are the main areas where Maori employees feel they require upskilling - Te Reo (73%), Epidemiology (72%, sig. greater than total workforce at 61%), Policy development (71%, sig. greater than total workforce at 61%), Contract Management (70%, sig. greater than total workforce at 57%), Advocacy (68%, sig. greater than total workforce at 58%)

Responsiveness to Maori Workforce
  • As would be expected, Maori organisations report being more responsive to their Maori staff than is reported by public health organisations overall. Maori responses are as follows - Peer support (90% Maori, 68% total employees), Funding and resources (88%, 60%), Forums for Maori to get together (88%, 57%), Access to Maori specific courses (86%, 63%), Mentoring (82%, 59%), Cultural supervision (86%, 54%)

 
 

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